ENGL1111
ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES
The course provides students with opportunities for practice and consolidation of strategies used in reading and writing for academic purposes in a variety of academic and social contexts. It tries to enhance vocabulary building and information search skills with an eye on language accuracy integrated in the reading and writing learning skills.
UNIH1000
ENGLISH FOR BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
This course is designed to provide students with those skills required to communicate effectively and efficiently at their future work place and increase their career prospects. Being directed towards the work environment, the course intends not just to familiarize students with the functional language they will need to employ in their future jobs, but also to build up their confidence in communicating in English and increase their fluency. In addition, the course is designed to enlarge the students’ general knowledge of the business world through the study of business-related texts and case studies. Particular focus is placed on business-related vocabulary, reading and writing skills. Students will also be given the opportunity to improve their presentation skills, specifically in relation to the profiling of a product or service. Limited focus is also placed on a range of grammatical structures used in English at a pre-intermediate level.
ENGL1112
USING MEDIA IN ENGLISH
The course covers the role and function of different media as communication tools in society. It enables students to compare between different media like newspapers, TV and the Internet and explore similarities and differences in their treatment of topics and news stories. It integrates the four macro skills, focusing more on reading and writing. It thus provides students with opportunities for realistic and meaningful practice to improve their English language proficiency.
ENGL1113
TRANSLATION I
The course introduces students to translation, particularly developing their awareness of a range of strategies and techniques used to translate. Participants will work with a range of short source text types in English: descriptive, informative, persuasive and technical. These will be used as a basis to explore core translation concepts: equivalence, equivalent effect, formal equivalence, dynamic equivalence, translatability, gain and loss in translation, invisibility of the translator, over-translation, under-translation, mistranslation, culture and ideology. Translation exercises will focus on the word level (idiomatic and proverbial expressions), sentence level and text level.
UNIR1001
OMAN AND ISLAMIC CULTURE
The course provides introduction to Islamic Culture, its importance, resources and characteristics, Islamic culture and contemporary events, Omanis role in spreading Islam and building Islamic civilisation.
UNIH2000
ENGLISH FOR ORGANISATIONAL COMMUNICATION
The purpose of the course is to equip students with the necessary skills/tools that are required in communicating within an organisation or business. It focuses on understanding the various types of communication that organisations use and ways in which to make and create effective communication.
ENGL1211
ENGLISH FOR CULTURE AND TOURISM
ENGL1211 introduces specialised listening, reading, speaking and writing strategies and skills for dealing with texts from the fields of culture and tourism. The course aims to develop students' related vocabulary and skills for dealing with of culture and tourism texts (e.g. dictionary skills, Referencing…etc.).
ENGL1212
ENGLISH FOR INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS
The course introduces students to a number of key international institutions from the perspective of their emergence, objectives, tasks, membership & power structure, and internal structure and helps in so doing enrich the students general knowledge and trigger their curiosity about international issues.
Relying on the analysis of input from a variety of texts, the course is equally intended to help develop language competences in reading, writing, and speaking from perspectives other than the conventional language textbooks.
ENGL1213
TRANSLATION II
This course constitutes an introduction to basic concepts in Translation Theory through the analysis and production of translated texts. Material for translation will be divided equally between English and Arabic texts and will be graded with regard to structural complexity. Through a focus on translation, mainly from English into Arabic, the course will also develop the participants’ understanding of a variety of structural issues in both languages and their impact on meaning. This will be implemented on a carefully selected set of texts.
UNIR1002
ARABIC SKILLS
It involves simple definition about Arabic language branches and skills (speaking, reading, writing…etc.) in addition to the fundamental rules that help mastering these skills.
ENGL2111
ENGLISH FOR TECHNOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
ENGL2111 introduces specialised reading, listening and speaking skills used to deal with texts from the fields of technology and the environment. The course also aims to develop students' related vocabulary and skills for dealing with technical texts (e.g. dictionary skills, referencing…etc.).
ENGL2112
CONTEMPORARY EVENTS IN ENGLISH
The course aims to expose students to major 20th century history events, trying to reconstruct and interpret the past through the investigation of a variety of sources. It tries to give students an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world, both past and present. It aims at equipping students with critical and analytical skills through the engagement in selection and interpretation of data and critical evaluation of it. Students hence appreciate the relative nature of historical knowledge and understanding, as each generation reflects its own world and preoccupations and as more evidence emerges. For translation students, the course expands students’ culture and broadens their knowledge of major global events.
LING2113
LINGUISTICS (A): PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY
LING2113 aims to introduce students to the discipline of linguistics by covering basic issues and concepts in phonetics (speech sounds), phonology (sound patterns) and phonological development. The focus of this subject is on the sounds and words of language.
WRIT2114
ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH I
This course aims to equip students with the strategies and skills required in academic writing, reading, and research. It provides grounding in formal English Grammar that will enhance students’ understanding of writing at the word, sentence and paragraph level. Topics covered include how readers read, how researchers research, how writers use rhetorical proofs to structure and substantiate persuasive arguments, and how scholars revise and edit documents to produce coherent and accessible prose.
UNIR2001
ENTRENEURSHIP
This course is an introductory course in entrepreneurship and innovation. The course aims to expose undergraduate students of various academic backgrounds of business venturing and entrepreneurial activity. Students will apply themselves through developing their own business ideas and assessing them using knowledge and skills acquired during the course.
TRAN2211
TRANSLATION III: MEDIA TRANSLATION
The course aims at developing proficiency in the translation of media, press and journalism texts. The course tries to illustrate genre-specific translation issues through theoretical and practical instances. It equally attempts to make students aware of and familiar with text specifications (style/structures/lexicon) related to this genre in SL (alternation between English and Arabic) and their adequate rendition in TL.
ENGL2211
ENGLISH FOR HEALTH SCIENCES
ENGL2211 introduces specialised reading, speaking and writing strategies and skills for dealing with topics and texts from the fields of health sciences. The course aims to develop students' related vocabulary and skills for dealing with health and medical related texts (e.g. dictionary skills, referencing).
ENGL2212
ENGLISH THROUGH LITERATURE
This course is an introduction to literature and literary works. It aims to introduce the basic concepts and relative terminology through a selection of illustrative accessible samples. Through careful focus on linguistic and stylistic aspects of language use in literature, the course aims to develop an appreciation of literary works while practicing language in context.
LING2213
LINGUISTICS (B): MORPHOLOGY AND LEXICAL SEMANTICS
The course builds on the analysis of words as combinations of phonemes in LING2113 (Phonetics and Phonology) and introduces the (larger) morpheme as the smallest meaningful unit. The course consists of two main components: word-form and word-meaning.  It introduces and/or consolidates inflectional morphemes which contribute to our use and understanding of other aspects of grammatical information (such as the continuous verb forms, possessive, and comparative forms).  The course thus provides students with further tools of analysis of what they have already acquired in past grammar courses. The second main (semantic) component addresses notions such as meaning relations between words: denotation, connotation, synonymy, antonymy, polysemy, homonymy, and homophony.  Generally, the course provides scope for comparison with Arabic word-formation both in inflection and derivation; and the translation student is particularly encouraged to apply his/her knowledge of morphological analysis of L2 on L1, or vice-versa.
WRIT2214
ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH II
This course aims to consolidate and put into practice the strategies and skills required in academic writing, reading, and research. It provides a practical repertoire in research techniques and academic writing and represents a venue for level 2 students to try research and assess their grasp and knowledge with regard to research skills and academic reporting and use of research output. As a continuation and a consolidation of what has been covered in semester ONE, topics in this course include how readers read; how researchers research; how writers use rhetorical proofs to structure and substantiate persuasive arguments; and how scholars revise and edit documents to produce coherent and accessible prose.
ENGL3111
ENGLISH IN THE WORKPLACE I
ENGL3111 is an introduction to models and skill bases of business communication. It is aims to develop a foundation and understanding in and of the field of communication. Students are introduced through this course to the general concepts of job environment they are likely to experience at workplace.
ENGL3112
ANGLOPHONE LITERATURE
This course aims at introducing the students to a rich diversity of cultural history and human values reflected in Anglophone writings produced in English speaking countries. Through short readings (essays, stories, poems and plays), students learn to observe, understand and evaluate how literary texts work.
LING3113
LINGUISTICS (C): SENTENCE STRUCTURE
This course builds on the previous courses in LING2113 and LING-2213, and introduces the student to the higher level of linguistic analysis of Sentence Structure (Syntax). This involves identification of lexical categories as heads of phrases and the way these phrases are organized in linear and hierarchical orders in a simple sentence (NP, VP, PP, AP, AdvP).  Deep and surface structure distinctions are illustrated through various movement types and structural ambiguities with emphasis on sentence generation using tree-diagrammes.  More complex sentences are also analysed to illustrate the features of structure-dependence and recursion, and introduce CP constituents with simple and Wh-questions, Relativisation, etc.   
COMM3114
SPOKEN ENGLISH COMMUNICATION I
The course addresses spoken communication from a theoretical perspective, introducing conversation analysis as an approach to the study of social interaction. The course raises student’s awareness of the ways in which users of English apply a range of resources and methods in conversation, exposing them to turn-taking organisation, sequencing organisation, overlap and repair as well as the techniques of conversation transcription. From a more practical perspective, it explores the functional role of spoken language in English, focusing on in-class discussions, role-play activities, interviews, presentations, and the telling of personal narratives.
LING3211
ENGLISH IN THE WORKPLACE II
This course builds on the previously covered areas in communication theories and workplace issues that students have been introduced to in ENGL3111. The course reinforces students’ understanding of workplace concepts and uses the same business environment for practice. Students do several business texts of relative difficulty and linguistic suitability.
COMM3212
SPOKEN ENGLISH COMMUNICATION II
This course is designed to provide further insights into the nature and mechanics of contemporary spoken English. Various features of spoken English, such as deixis, fixed expressions, tailing, fronting, hedging, vague language, prosodic features - will also be introduced and explored in detail. Additionally, the course provides students with worthwhile opportunities to practice and improve their own spoken communicative skills in English through in-class discussions/debates, role-play activities, interviews, and the telling of personal narratives.
LING3213
LINGUISTICS (D): SOCIOLINGUISTICS
The course builds on the analytical skills acquired in Linguistics-related courses LING2113 (Phonetics and Phonology), LING2213 (Morphology and Lexical Semantics), and LING3113 (Syntax and Structural Semantics). Specifically, the course provides students with further opportunities for applying their linguistic tools of analysis to English as used in its socio-cultural contexts. Notions such as differences between languages and (regional) dialects/accents, register, code-switching, language use in relation to gender and age or social identity, language, power, and education policy, etc. These will be covered with a view to comparing and contrasting with Arabic language and dialectal dimensions that may assist the student in language studies generally, translation in particular.
LING3214
LINGUISTICS (E): PRAGMATICS
The course addresses the most salient issues covered in Pragmatics, the study of language in context and communication in contrast with Linguistics. For the translation students, the course equally attempts to relate the discussion to translation questions. The focus for the English Language Studies pathway the intent is to achieve a more in-depth understanding and analysis of texts.
WRIT4111
PROFESSIONAL WRITING I
This course examines theoretical principles of writing in the professional workplace and basic writing techniques with practical application through reading, discussion and extensive writing exercises. It introduces conventions and formats of professional writing such as audience analysis, features of plain language, medium, style and purpose; in addition to the different stages of the writing process –plan, draft, edit and revise.
COMM4112
RHETORIC AND COMMUNICATION
This course introduces the history of rhetoric, rhetorical analysis and skills of persuasive communication. The course is explicitly designed to raise student’s awareness of rhetorical devices such as hedging, symbolism, metaphor, analogy, idiom, paradox, oxymoron, personification, cliché, stereotype, irony and humour.  
Students will be given the opportunity to improve their own rhetorical skills through in-class practice with oral debates and academic writing that is argumentative in tone.
LING4113
LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND LEARNING
This course offers an introduction to the most influential theories of first and second language acquisition as they relate to foreign (L2) language teaching and learning. These are related to further investigations into learner differences, the nature of L1 & L2 language and learner characteristics, age, and stages of development. Major factors that affect L2-learning are focused on such as motivation, attitude, aptitude, cultural background; and how they relate to classroom interaction and instruction.
WRIT4114
THE GRAMMAR OF WRITING
This is an advanced English grammar course dealing with the more complex structures that are characteristic of written language. It focuses on grammatical structures, namely phrases and clauses, and how these structures are used in the realisation of different communicative goals. It also deals with practical analysis of the sentence in English which aims at raising the student’s overall written competencies. A range of authentic written texts will be used to demonstrate the use of grammatical structures and their effects.
WRIT4211
PROFESSIONAL WRITING II
This course is a continuation of WRIT4111 and combines theoretical understanding with practical application through reading, discussion and extensive writing exercises. It covers conventions and formats of professional writing and involves organizing and presenting written texts with an emphasis on clear, precise, objective thinking as well as writing; demonstrated through a series of written documents.
ENGL4212
METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH
This course aims to familiarize the trainees with the main ETL concepts and their relevance to each other. It equally presents the main approaches and methods of ELT and their implication in EFL classes.
COMM4213
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND THE MEDIA
This course aims to develop students' ability to read and analyse media (from local to international) by studying areas, such as news, entertainment, film, sport and tourism and exposing students to media language, content and style and therefore become media literate. This course tries to develop strategies and techniques that qualify them to deal with media texts. The training on this side is given in the form of workshops, intensive group work and class discussion.
ENGL4214
ENGLISH LANGUAGE THROUGH STORIES
This course encourages students’ participation in reading, commenting and thinking critically. It is meant to develop learners’ language through stories and picture books as well. The course equally aims to reinforce students’ listening and reading skills, help them build self-confidence, and increase their motivation to read. It covers a range of topics such as the criteria of sorting stories according to various language levels, testing language through stories, methods of teaching easy-start stories and abridged stories, analyzing stories, and remembering and retelling.